THCA: The Cannabinoid That “Gets No Respect”

Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinoic acid or THCA, like the late great Rodney Dangerfield, simply “gets no respect” when compared with higher profile cannabinoids like CBD, CBG, or CBN that are highly touted in medical cannabis circles.

THCA is the carboxylated precursor of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. Unlike THC, THCA is not psychoactive and can be found in high concentrations (10%-20%) in certain cannabis strains (1). Interestingly, there is a growing body of evidence that suggest that THCA may possess a variety of medically-beneficial, therapeutic properties.

First, THCA has been reported to possess potent in vitro anti-inflammatory properties similar to those exhibited by COX-2 inhibitors like Celebrex (2). Second, THCA exhibited neuroprotective effects in various tissue culture and animal models of Parkinson’s disease (3). Finally, THCA may possess antiproliferative and anti-tumor effects against prostate cancer (4)

Unfortunately, like most other cannabinoid research, additional studies must be conducted to confirm or refute possible therapeutic benefits of THCA. That said, it is a cannabinoid that deserves more respect than it is currently getting!

References

  1. Baker PB, Taylor BJ, Gough TA. The tetrahydrocannabinol and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid content of cannabis products. J. Pharm & Pharmacol. 1981; 33:369-372.
  2. Ruhaak LR, Felth, J, Karlsson PC, Rafer JJ, et al. Evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibiting effects of six major cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa Biologic and Pharmaceutical Bull; 2011 34:774-778
  3. Moldzio R, Pacher T, Krewenka C, Kranner B, et al. Effects of cannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid and cannabidiol in MPP+ affected murine mesencephalic cultures. Phytomed 2012: 19:819-824.
  4. De Pretrocellis L, Ligresti A, Moriello AS, Iappelli M, Verde R, et al. Non-THC cannabinoids inhibit prostate carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo: pro-apoptotic effects and underlying mechanisms. Br. J. Pharmacol 2013: 168:79-102